Recent Changes

Wednesday, August 16

  1. page home edited ... >>>>>>2009 E-language Wordle [ enlarge {Wordle-2009.png} ] >>>>…
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    Contact: There's no such thing as a finished wiki. Like all wikis, this one is a work in progress and there will be changes from time to time in organisation, content and links. However, don't let that stop you from contacting me at any time with comments, suggestions or questions.
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  2. page home edited ... >>>>>>2008 E-language Wordle [ enlarge {E-language2.png} ] Contact: There's…
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    Contact: There's no such thing as a finished wiki. Like all wikis, this one is a work in progress and there will be changes from time to time in organisation, content and links. However, don't let that stop you from contacting me at any time with comments, suggestions or questions.
    Local time in Perth, Western Australia
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  3. page home edited ... Wordle Gallery 2008-2016: The images below represent the old front pages of the E-language Wi…
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    Wordle Gallery 2008-2016:
    The images below represent the old front pages of the E-language Wiki.
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    index, of onlineeducational technology resources.
    {Wordle 2016.png}
    {Wordle 2015-A.png}
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    >>>>>>2009 E-language Wordle [ enlarge {Wordle-2009.png} ]
    >>>>>>2008 E-language Wordle [ enlarge {E-language2.png} ]
    Credits: The main image above left, entitled Wordle 2013, draws together items from the Delicious E-learning tagcloud and was created with Wordle software. It can be accessed directly here. As of 2012, owing to changes to the structure of Delicious, it is necessary to create tagcloud images using Wordle Advanced. The visitors' globe was created with Revolver Map software. The site logo was created using the Web 2.0 Free Logo Generator. The clock below comes from ClockLink.
    Contact: There's no such thing as a finished wiki. Like all wikis, this one is a work in progress and there will be changes from time to time in organisation, content and links. However, don't let that stop you from contacting me at any time with comments, suggestions or questions.
    Local time in Perth, Western Australia
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  4. page home edited ... Please note that the content of the E-language Wiki has now been migrated to the new Digital L…
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    Please note that the content of the E-language Wiki has now been migrated to the new Digital Learning website.
    Wordle Gallery 2008-2016:
    The images below represent the
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    years, from 2018-2016,2008-2016, in the
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    word cloud has beenwas created from
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    Wordle software. It reflectsThese word clouds reflect emerging and
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    online resources. The 2015 word cloud can be seen at the top of the page. Past word clouds are shown below.
    {Wordle 2016.png}
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  5. page home edited Home ordle Please note that the content of the E-language Wiki has now been migrated to the ne…

    Home
    ordlePlease note that the content of the E-language Wiki has now been migrated to the new Digital Learning website.
    Wordle
    Gallery 2008-2015:2008-2016:
    The images represent the old front pages of the E-language Wiki.

    Every year for the past eight9 years, from 2018-2016, in the
    {Wordle 2016.png}
    {Wordle 2015-A.png}
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  6. page home edited Home {Wordle 2016A.jpg} Welcome to the E-language wiki, where you'll find a growing set of res…

    Home
    {Wordle 2016A.jpg} Welcome to the E-language
    wiki, where you'll find a growing set of resources about e-learning: the place where digital technologies and education intersect. The Wordle image on the left gives an overview of key themes on this site, drawn from the E-learning tag cloud. Click on the image for a larger version. To get a sense of how the emphasis of the E-language wiki has shifted over the past few years, you might like to take a look at the Wordle gallery at the bottom of this page. The Revolver Map above right shows the location of current and recent visitors to this page. Click on it for a larger version.
    The wiki itself is divided into 4 main sections. Under E-learning resources in the main menu on the left, you'll find information on web 1.0 in education (ranging from webquests and drills to quizzes and sims), web 2.0 in education (ranging from wikis and social networking to podcasting and m-learning) and early moves towards web 3.0 in education. A list of e-tools provides options for you to create your own online materials, the myths of e-learning page lists some common fallacies about e-learning, and the digital safety page lists cybersafety resources for educators. If, after all that, you need a laugh, try the humour page ...
    The E-learning references section contains an e-learning tag cloud with links to recent resources; a blog feeds page to help you keep up to date with some of the most useful blogs dealing with digital technologies in education; and a Twitter feeds page listing innovators and commentators you might like to follow, alongside recent tweets from Mark Pegrum's feed. The E-learning journals page contains a list of journals relevant to e-learning and digital technologies, while the E-learning references page consists of a broad range of academic and journalistic references which underpin the E-learning courses described in the third section.
    The E-learning training section includes links to Mark Pegrum's courses, student projects from those courses, and Mark Pegrum's E-language blog, which is composed of conference and course notes.
    Finally, to find out more about Mark Pegrum, the creator of these pages, see the biodata section at the end - or check out his latest Twitter updates.
    Please note that in early 2010 the TESOL pages formerly listed in the left-hand menu were separated from the main wiki, which is now focused more directly and exclusively on e-learning. Although it is no longer updated, you can still find the key TESOL content here.
    Wordle Gallery
    Wordle
    ordle Gallery 2008-2015:
    Every year for the past eight years, in the first week of August, a word cloud has been created from the E-learning tagcloud using Wordle software. It reflects emerging and changing points of emphasis in Mark Pegrum's folksonomy, or social index, of online resources. The 2015 word cloud can be seen at the top of the page. Past word clouds are shown below.
    {Wordle 2016.png}
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Tuesday, May 30

  1. page wikis edited ... with web 2.0 {icon-intro1} {icon-blog1} {icon-chat1} {icon-dv1} {button-DS-blue1} {i…

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    - ► category -
    2.0: Wikis are perhaps the ultimate web 2.0 tool. They allow users to collaboratively create multimodal documents, and comment on and edit each other's work. Thus, they relate very much to the principle of collective intelligence. While some wikis have partly optimised their displays for mobile devices, dedicated mobile wiki services or apps are unusual (see Going Mobile below).
    - ► what - Wikis are collaboratively authored websites. The image at left shows the logo of the largest and best-known wiki, Wikipedia. Note, however,

    Please note
    that Wikipedia is just one example of a wiki: there are countless wikis, large and small, on the web, covering all kinds of subjects. Many of them have been set up by educational institutions, where they may be used with students of all ages, from kindergarten to tertiary level.
    Fully public wikis, like Wikipedia, allow anyone, anywhere in the world, to make additions and modifications (with restrictions on pages covering sensitive topics, such as some international conflicts or biographies of political figures). Partially public wikis, like this E-language wiki, are publicly viewable but can only be edited by those with a password. Fully private wikis, such as those often used at school level, require users to have a password even to view the wiki.
    - ► why - Wikis rely on the principle of collective intelligence and the notion that the product of collaborative work is often superior to what can be created by a single individual. Advantages for students include the ability to draft and redraft work collaboratively, with each contributor adding to and modifying the work of others. Nowadays it is also easy to embed images, videos, RSS feeds and other dynamic content. Wikis are the perfect platform for social constructivist and community of practice approaches, and they are ideal for promoting a sense of a learning community. Feedback can be received from the entire internet (with a public wiki) or class peers (with a private wiki).
    Standard wiki functions, often shown as a series of tabs at the top of wiki pages, include:
    discussion: every wiki page normally includes a discussion function, giving access to an asynchronous discussion board. This allows users to discuss
    the content of a given page.
    history:
    this function allows changes to be tracked by users. The history function is a wiki's inbuilt security mechanism: if a page is vandalised or, more likely, if material is accidentally deleted, it is easy to undo these changes by going one step back in the history log. The same history function also makes it possible for teachers to track individual students' contributions to group projects, because each change (including the identity of the author in a system where users require a password) is logged.
    subscribe: most wikis allow users to subscribe to an RSS feed so that they can be notified of changes made to pages they have chosen to watch.
    - ► how - For a light-hearted introduction to the principles underpinning wikis, see Lee LeFever's video Wikis in Plain English. For a more extensive general introduction, see Wiki35. If you're interested in setting up your own wiki, see Russell Stannard's video How to make wikis or Nik Peachey's Creating a wiki. For ideas on how to use wikis in education, see Educational Wikis, or Nik Peachey's Using wikis with EFL students and Using wikis for teacher development. WikiIndex is a wiki about wikis - and includes links to wikis on a vast array of topics.
    - ► where - Like blogs, wikis can be quickly and easily set up at no cost, though many wiki services work on a freemium model where payment is required to have advertisements removed or to access additional functionality such as increased privacy options. Some wiki services offer enhanced functionality to educators at no additional cost; it is simply a matter of registering a wiki as being for educational purposes.
    The most popular wiki services with educators are currently Wikispaces (which hosts this E-language wiki) and PBworks (formerly PBwiki). Alternatives include Wikia, Wikidot and WikiFoundry (formerly Wetpaint). Some website services, such as Google Sites,
    has now also offer wiki-style functionality. It's worth looking at a few wiki and website services before choosing which onebeen migrated to use. The WikiMatrix site, which makes it easy to compare wikis, might help you to make your decision. For tips on how to incorporate different kinds of multimedia functionality into Wikispaces without knowledge of html code, see Getting Tricky with Wikis.
    mobile
    - ► going mobile - Some wiki services, such as Wikispaces, have mobile-optimised versions which are displayed automatically when they are accessed from mobile devices. With the demise of Picowiki, there no longer appear to be any wiki services designed specifically for mobile devices.
    - ► examples - As noted above, the most famous wiki is of course Wikipedia, which has versions in many languages. For an example of how a typical Wikipedia article evolves, see Jon Udell's screencast of the "Heavy metal umlaut" article. You might like to compare Wikipedia with an example of a moderated wiki such as the Encyclopedia of Life, launched in early 2008.
    Examples of academic wikis include Lawrence Lessig's Anti-Lessig Reader, where readers are invited to critique his work. We are increasingly seeing wikis being used to add a collaborative element to authorship. A good example of a wiki used for organisation-wide communication and collaboration is the Smithsonian Library's Tech Services Wiki.
    While many school-based wikis are not publicly viewable, some exceptions include: flatplanet (an environmental wiki collaboratively built by high school classes in Canada and the UK); Y11 Evolution (a biology wiki based at a Hong Kong school where students collaboratively 'wrote the textbook' in a Wikipedia-style format); and The 50 Greatest Rockers of All Time (based at a US school). For further examples, see Examples of Educational Wikis.
    You can also see screen captures of a number of wiki projects on the student projects page of this wiki, including e-portfolios created on the Wikispaces platform.
    - ► variations - Blikis, also known as blokis, fuse key features of blogs and wikis. While blikis were widely discussed for a couple of years around 2008-2010, little is heard about them nowadays.
    To publish constant instantly online, without the need to set up a website, blog or wiki, try Check This.
    - ► dangers - Collaboration doesn't just happen by itself: students need detailed instructions, and activities need careful scaffolding, in order to ensure wide engagement. Collective intelligence is not a predetermined outcome; collective ignorance is also a possibility, meaning that a teacher needs to keep a close eye on students' emerging ideas, and intervene if and when necessary. As with any group project, aggression and bullying can occur, so it's a good idea to set up rules of netiquette beforehand, ideally in consultation with students, and to have a moderator who keeps an eye on proceedings.
    Most web 2.0 services, including wiki services, offer different levels of privacy. With young learners, or in contexts where learners reveal their identities, it may be best to make wikis entirely private. With older students and less personally sensitive content, it may be appropriate to make wikis partly or wholly public, so that they can be viewed by others and may even receive feedback.
    - ► more - For academic and journalistic references about wikis, see the E-learning references page. You'll also find current information in the E-learning tag cloud.
    Credits: The image above left shows the Wikipedia logo. I owe the Getting Tricky with Wikis link to Tricia Green, the John Udell link to Vance Stevens, and the wikidot link to Vanessa Varis.
    Contact: There's no such thing as a finished wiki. Like all wikis, this one is a work in progress and there will be changes from time to time in organisation, content and links. However, don't let that stop you from contacting me at any time with comments, suggestions or questions.
    http://markpegrum.com/tools-for-digital-learning/wikis/.
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    {CC-Skype-1.jpg} - ► category - VoIP, or Voice over Internet Protocol, permits internet telephony on desktop or laptop computers. The best-known
    2.0: VoIP service, Skype (see icon on left), is also available in an app version for mobile devices where, along with other similar apps, it offers an alternative to voice calls through a telephone service (see Going Mobile below).
    - ► what - VoIP refers to voice calls made over

    Please note that
    the internet, though nowadays it often takes the formcontent of video calls, often with supplementary text channels.
    - ► why - VoIP is an ideal tool for conducting live interviews or pair and small group discussions. These can be recorded and reviewed or transcribed later, and well-designed oral tasks can also form the basis for assessments. There are obvious applications of VoIP for language learning in particular, which
    this page has lednow been migrated to a number of services building language learning functionality around Skype or similar VoIP technology.
    - ► how - For information on using Skype and recording conversations for language learning, see Nik Peachey's Skype Part 1: Recording Audio and Skype Part 2: Online Workspace.
    - ► where - In addition to the well-known Skype, other VoIP services include Google+ Hangouts and Oovoo. For a fuller list, see Wikipedia's Comparison of VoIP Software.
    Language exchange services can help to organise voice chat, often through Skype, and often with accompanying text channels. Examples include The Mixxer, My Language Exchange and the SharedTalk Language Exchange Network. eTandem is a more generalised service for finding language learning partners.
    Recordings of VoIP calls can be made using free software, such as Pamela (which allows free recordings of up to 15 minutes) and the many alternatives listed in MakeUseOf's The Quickest, Easiest Way to Record Skype.
    mobile
    - ► going mobile - Apps such as Skype and Tango provide alternatives to voice telephony on smart devices, as does Apple's FaceTime on the iPhone. This can help avoid telephone costs in areas covered by wifi. All of the above apps offer a video channel in addition to an audio channel. See also Variations below.
    {Weixin.png} - ► variations - Variations on VoIP include audio discussion boards (sometimes called voiceboards), which can be set up through Gong or Voxopop. Audio messages can also be exchanged on apps such as FaceTime, WhatsApp and Weixin (微信) (known as WeChat in the international market; see icon on right), and the HelloTalk app designed specifically for language practice. With the SpeakingPal app, learners can chat to an animated video character, and thanks to speech recognition technology, they receive feedback on their own responses.
    - ► more - For academic and journalistic references about VoIP, see the E-learning references page.
    Credits: The image of the Skype logo above left is available under a Creative Commons licence from Phil Wolff's Photostream on Flickr; the original can be found here. I owe several links to Claire Pinks.
    Contact: There's no such thing as a finished wiki. Like all wikis, this one is a work in progress and there will be changes from time to time in organisation, content and links. However, don't let that stop you from contacting me at any time with comments, suggestions or questions.
    http://markpegrum.com/tools-for-digital-learning/voip/.
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    12:08 am

Monday, May 29

  1. page vodcasting edited ... with web 2.0 {icon-intro1} {icon-blog1} {icon-chat1} {icon-dv1} {button-DS-blue1} {i…

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    - ► category - Vodcasts, like podcasts, can be used in a web 1.0 manner for information transmission, or they can be used in a web 2.0 manner where students create their own vodcasts. Vodcasts are traditionally associated with e-learning rather than m-learning, but with the explosion of video viewing on mobile devices, especially those with 4G connectivity, vodcasts may be on their way to becoming a key m-learning technology. Common videosharing services are typically available in mobile app versions (see Going Mobile below).
    - ► what - Vodcasts are much like podcasts except
    2.0: Vodcasting
    Please note
    that they involve video rather than (just) audio. Like podcasts, they are distributed on the web via syndicated feeds such as RSS, so once you've subscribed, you'll be prompted to download new episodes as they become available. However, as with podcasting, there has been considerable slippage in the usecontent of the term: itthis page has become common to hear people refer to any online videos, whether syndicated or not, as vodcasts.
    - ► why - Option 1 Vodcasts can be used in a web 1.0 manner, with students simply watching videos which are either professionally produced, or prerecorded by their teachers. Students may be asked to watch such videos in their own time before class as part of a flipped classroom approach. Although vodcasts lack the flexibility of podcasts since it is necessary to watch as well as listen to them, it is becoming increasingly common for users to watch vodcasts on mobile devices (see Going Mobile below).
    Option 2 Vodcasts can be used in a more web 2.0 manner, with students being asked to create their own videos. Vodcasts are often used as a platform for digital storytelling, and can be used to showcase both individual and collaborative student projects. Once the resulting vodcasts have
    now been fully edited and polished up, they can be published on the web for feedback from peers, parents and friends, and the wider internet.
    - ► how - Option 1 Vodcasts can be found on numerous sites, including many which have an educational orientation, such as the Khan Academy, TED, and WatchKnowLearn. Services like YouTube allow the creation of playlists, many of which may be educational (see for example the image of the Web 2.0 Tools and Technologies playlist at the top of this page). For a fuller list of sources of vodcasts, see the videosharing section of the social sharing page on this wiki.
    Option 2 Producing a vodcast typically involves several steps:
    recording a video using a video camera, regular digital camera, or mobile phone
    editing the video on a computer using common software such as iMovie (on a Mac) or Windows Movie Maker (on a PC). Alternative video editing software is listed on the E-tools page of this wiki.
    uploading the video
    migrated to a service such as those listed under videosharing on the social sharing page of this wiki
    mobile
    - ► going mobile - With video consumption exploding on 4G-enabled smart devices, vodcasting is increasingly a mobile tool. The major videosharing services, like Blip, Vimeo and YouTube, are available in mobile app versions. What's more, the cameras on contemporary mobile phones and tablets can be used to record vodcasts. With the help of appropriate apps, these devices - especially tablets - can then be used to edit and polish up vodcasts ready for subsequent publishing and sharing.
    - ► examples - Many sources of professionally produced videos can be found on the social sharing page of this wiki. In addition, more and more TV stations are beginning to make broadcast material available at any time for users to catch up on; examples include the ABC's iView (Australia), Channel 4's 4oD (UK), or CNN's Video (USA). The line between television, video and vodcasting is starting to blur.
    Good examples of teacher-produced vodcasts can be seen on Mr Derby's 12 Literature 3A/3B Class Blog, which supports a flipped classroom approach. Good examples of student-produced vodcasts can be accessed through ACMI's Generator (Australia) or HKIS's DragonMedia (Hong Kong).
    - ► variations - Variations which are useful if you don't want to show your face, or don't want students to show their faces, include services like Voki or Blabberize, where animated characters 'speak' audio files on your behalf. For educational tips, see the Voki for Education Blog. Other similar tools can be found under animations on the E-tools page of this wiki. Apps with similar functionality include Tellagami.
    GoAnimate and Muvizu allow the creation of animated videos. Machinima movies, which can be easily produced by teachers or students in virtual worlds or gaming environments, also hold considerable potential.
    Knowmia is a service which makes it easy to create educational videos. VideoScribe is a service for making animated whiteboard videos in the style of the well-known RSA Animate whiteboard videos.
    TED-Ed, launched by TED in 2012, offers customisable lessons built around videos, and allows educators to create their own lessons built around any YouTube video. EduCanon is another service teachers can use to add information or quiz 'bulbs' to videos. Zaption and EDpuzzle are services for adding interactive quiz questions into videos.
    - ► dangers - If students show their faces or reveal their identities in vodcasts, it may be advisable to share them only in password-protected online spaces. Where students plan on sharing their work more widely, animation services such as those listed above under Variations may provide suitable alternatives to traditional video footage.
    Credits: The Web 2.0 Tools and Technologies playlist image comes from YouTube. I owe the Mr Derby blog link to Paula Beck, the Tellagami link to Paul Forster, and the VideoScribe link to Adrian Smith & Olivia Cassar.
    Contact: There's no such thing as a finished wiki. Like all wikis, this one is a work in progress and there will be changes from time to time in organisation, content and links. However, don't let that stop you from contacting me at any time with comments, suggestions or questions.
    http://markpegrum.com/tools-for-digital-learning/videos/.
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    5:35 am

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